Steve's Herpetological Blog

An insight into the life of Steve, his research and the many books he reads

Books

#StevesLibrary: Bee Quest

After finishing to read His Imperial Majesty recently, I thought I’d keep with the entomological theme and read Bee Quest. Insects are one of those groups of animals that fascinate me deeply, but were just beaten by amphibians and reptiles….

#StevesLibrary: His Imperial Majesty

You may remember a short while ago when I reviewed The Butterfly Isles by Patrick Barkham, it was during this book that I first me the eccentric character that is Matthew Oates. In Barkham’s book, Oates helps him to see…

#StevesLibrary: The Body

Bill Bryson is one of those authors that I respect for taking on the challenge of writing books on the most impossible topics. The Body: A Guide for Occupants is no exception. How on Earth do you go about summarising…

#StevesLibrary: Winged Obsession

There aren’t many books out there on the illegal wildlife trade, which is a shame as it is an interesting and often overlooked area of conservation. Some of you may remember back to last summer when I read Stolen Worlds,…

#StevesLibrary: Silent Spring

I don’t know why it’s taken me so long to read Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, especially being a conservationist. Thankfully, I finally have and I’m glad I did. Despite the fact that Silent Spring was published 60 years ago,…

#StevesLibrary: Sex, Botany and Empire

After reading The Naming of the Shrew recently, I was eager to find our more about Carl Linnaeus in an easily digestible format. That is where Sex, Botany & Empire comes in. The author, Patricia Fara is a historian of…

#StevesLibrary: The Drunken Forest

I had to end 2021 on a positive note, and so I chose to read The Drunken Forest by Gerald Durrell, for the simple fact that Durrell’s writing is always something that helps fill you with optimism and hope. Durrell…

#StevesLibrary: All That Remains

When you pick up a book about death, you expect it to be slightly sad and macabre. That is just the nature of the subject. Yet, Professor Dame Sue Black is able to make death a more welcoming subject by…

#StevesLibrary: What Do You Think Are?

When I first picked up What Do You Think You Are? by Brian Clegg, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I’d just finished I, Mammal by Liam Drew which documents what makes humans mammals, which meant that I was already…

#StevesLibrary: I, Mammal

My reading tendencies lead to me reading books on all kinds of topics, depending on what I decide to pick up off of the shelf at that moment time. Sometimes I pick a book on a topic, with which I…