Steve's Herpetological Blog

An insight into the life of Steve, his research and the many books he reads

StevenAllain

#StevesLibrary: No Need for Geniuses

It’s very easy as a Brit to forget that there are other countries out there that have made important contributions to science and engineering. In my mind, it is frustrating that throughout our schooling, our attention is made only to…

#SteveReviews: Seaspiracy

I’ve been waiting for the dust to settle on this one for a little while as the subject is quite controversial. Seaspiracy is a new Netflix documentary (trailer below), that examines the global fishing industry. Now this may not sound…

#StevesLibrary: Secrets of the Human Body

Something that has always fascinated me is the human body, how it works and how we figured out how so. Therfore in my mind, Secrets of the Human Body was going to be a fantastic read. I think I’m right…

#SteveReviews: Attenborough’s Life in Colour

In recent years, it seems that Sir David Attenborough has been working around the clock to narrate a number of spectacularly produced wildlife documentaries. These such as A Perfect Planet and Seven Worlds, One Planet in my mind omit the…

#StevesLibrary: How to Clone a Mammoth

Back in 2013, I watched a number of TEDx talks uploaded to YouTube on the topic of de-extinction (you can find the playlist here). These introduced me to the idea of de-extinction and at the time, I was all for…

#SteveLibrary: The Butterfly Isles

One of my earliest memories of being immersed in nature (other than chasing lizards or frogs), is running round a field with a butterfly net trying to catch butterflies. It’s not nearly as easy as it looks, most of the…

#SciFri: Why we need to accept that extinction is forever

Recently, news broke that stunned the scientific community. Members of the Thylacine Awareness Group of Australia revealed that they had irrefutable proof of the existence of thylacines, an extinct marsupial wolf-like creature that was once native to most of Australasia….

#StevesLibrary: Spix’s Macaw

The writings are Tony Juniper are not unknown to me, I’ve read and reviews two of his books previously. What was unknown to me was the fact that he spent what seems a lifetime researching, for a book on the…

#StevesLibrary: The Brief Life of Flowers

One of the consequences of the recent lockdowns, is a growing love for flowers. The garden in the house I’m renting was a bit of a jungle, but recently my partner and I took all of our frustration out on…

#SciFri: The power of citizen science

Imagine you’re running a project to map the distribution of a species or observe a phenological event such as the spawning of frogs. How is one person (or a small team of people) going to be able to collect data…