Steve's Herpetological Blog

An insight into the life of Steve, his research and the many books he reads

Reading

#StevesLibrary: The Lie of the Land

It probably isn’t a surprise to many of you that I developed a deep interest in geology as a teen and even studied it at A-level in college. Since those days, I have followed my true passion of zoology/herpetology but…

#StevesLibrary: Your Inner Fish

Note: Hi everyone, sorry for the lack of posts recently – I’ve just started my PhD fieldwork and so I’ve been quite busy with that and a few other things. Don’t worry though, I will now be blogging again on…

#StevesLibrary: The Unexpected Truth About Animals

Over Christmas and the New Year I managed to finish off a book I’d been meaning to finish for a while, that is Lucy Cooke’s The Unexpected Truth About Animals. The book itself is extremely well written, being both a…

#StevesLibrary: Darwin’s Ghosts: In Search of the First Evolutionists

Rebecca Stott has authored a couple of books on the life of the most famous naturalist, Charles Darwin. The first titled ‘Darwin and the Barnacle’ outlines his labour of love to classify and learn everything he could do about barnacles….

#StevesLibrary: Oxygen: The Molecule That Made the World

Some of you may remember that I went to see Nick Lane give a talk at the Linnean Society of London back in March. I’d been aware of Nick’s research for a while involving the evolution of life. For those…

#StevesLibrary: Elephants on Acid

If like me, some of the more questionable experiments in history such as the Harlow experiments investigating the isolation of infant monkeys interest you as much as they shock you, then ‘Elephants on Acid’ by Alex Boese is certainly a…

#StevesLibrary: The Diversity of Life

In 2016 when I spent 3 months in Malaysia, I took a number of books to read on the flights but also for during the downtime. It turned out that I actually read most before bed, or when we were…